Adam Kirsch in conversation with Heba El-Shazli

Sunday, April 30, 2017
1:00pm — 2:30pm
Politics & Prose Bookstore
5015 Connecticut Avenue NW
Washington DC 20008
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GlobalNovelGlobalization has touched almost every aspect of daily life; it makes sense, then, that literature also has a new role in this expansive new world. In his brief and thought-provoking discussion of the novel in the era of globalization, Kirsch, a poet, critic, and author of Why Trilling Matters, considers the work of some of today’s most innovative and authoritative writers, including Haruki Murakami, Elena Ferrante, Roberto Bolaño, and Margaret Atwood. The narrative of the global age, Kirsch, suggests, depends less on traditional genre than on the writer’s way of imagining the world. Kirsch will be in conversation with Heba F. El-Shazli, assistant professor at George Mason University’s Schar School of Policy and Government and adjunct faculty at Georgetown University’s Master’s Degree Program at the Center for Democracy and Civil Society.

This event is free to attend with no reservation required. Seating is available on a first come, first served basis. Click here for more information.

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Add to Calendar 4/30/2017 13:00 4/30/2017 14:30 MM/DD/YYYY Adam Kirsch in conversation with Heba El-Shazli

Globalization has touched almost every aspect of daily life; it makes sense, then, that literature also has a new role in this expansive new world. In his brief and thought-provoking discussion of the novel in the era of globalization, Kirsch, a poet, critic, and author of Why Trilling Matters, considers the work of some of today’s… more

Politics & Prose Bookstore
5015 Connecticut Avenue NW
Washington DC 20008

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