Planes, Trains and Root Canals

Wednesday, February 10, 2016
6:00pm — 7:00pm
Jerome Greene Hall, Room 105
Columbia Law School
435 W 116th St
New York, NY 10027
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  • Sasha Issenberg, author of Outpatients: The Astonishing New World of Medical Tourism
  • Michael W. Doyle, University Professor, Director of Columbia Global Policy Initiative, Member of the Committee on Global Thought
  • Nicholas Lemann, Edith Pulitzer Moore Professor of Journalism, Director of Columbia Global Reports

Medical tourism is growing rapidly. The question is whether it represents the future of healthcare, which traditionally, at least in the developed world, has been a core responsibility of national governments. The tie between where a company has its headquarters and where it manufactures its products was broken long ago. It may be that people will start outsourcing their checkups and operations to the lowest provider, no matter where, in the same way. And that will mean that the purpose of government will have to change too.

On February 10, 2016, Columbia Global Reports and the Committee on Global Thought welcome Outpatients author Sasha Issenberg, Columbia University Professor and Committee on Global Thought member Michael Doyle, and Director of Columbia Global Reports Nicholas Lemann, to a panel discussion on medical tourism, global healthcare, and Issenberg’s new book Outpatients: The Astonishing New World of Medical Tourism. The discussion will take place from 6-7PM at Columbia Law School Jerome Greene Hall, room 105.

“In Switzerland, you get chocolates and watches. In Hungary, you get dentistry.”

Space will go quickly! Register for the event today at medical-tourism.eventbrite.com.

About Outpatients: Globalization produces a lot of odd results around the world. One of them is that Hungary has become the dentistry capital of Europe: thanks to aggressive marketing campaigns and heavy government support, more people go there for dental care than to any other country in Europe. The towns of Mosonmagyaróvár and Sopron boast the highest concentrations of dental clinics in the world.

The story of how Hungary became Europe’s dental chair is a case study in the booming practice of medical tourism. It is a rapidly growing business, as patients go in search of lower prices, and some countries have found economic opportunity in turning health care into a global trade. An American with insurance can expect to pay $90,000 for a heart bypass in the U.S., but only $12,000 if he or she travels to Thailand. The question is whether medial tourism represents the future of health care, which traditionally has been a core responsibility of national governments. Sasha Issenberg’s acclaimed books, The Sushi Economy and The Victory Lab, were early in identifying changes in the way the world works. A brilliant journalist with a keen eye for significant trends, he now turns his talents to medical tourism, and gives us a funny, vivid, wise narrative that will change the way you think about health care.

Press Contact: Camille McDuffie
Phone: 212-854-9563
Email: ctm2131@columbia.edu

RSVP

Add to Calendar 2/10/2016 18:00 2/10/2016 19:00 MM/DD/YYYY Planes, Trains and Root Canals

Sasha Issenberg, author of Outpatients: The Astonishing New World of Medical Tourism Michael W. Doyle, University Professor, Director of Columbia Global Policy Initiative, Member of the Committee on Global Thought Nicholas Lemann, Edith Pulitzer Moore Professor of Journalism, Director of Columbia Global Reports Medical tourism is growing rapidly. The question is whether it represents the future of… more

Jerome Greene Hall, Room 105
Columbia Law School
435 W 116th St
New York, NY 10027

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