Adam Kirsch at The Corner Bookstore

Thursday, April 27, 2017
6:00pm — 7:30pm
The Corner Bookstore
1313 Madison Avenue
New York, NY 10128
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GlobalNovelWhat will 21st-century fiction look like?

Acclaimed literary critic Adam Kirsch examines some of our most beloved writers, including Haruki Murakami, Elena Ferrante, Roberto Bolaño, and Margaret Atwood, to better understand literature in the age of globalization.

The global novel, he finds, is not so much a genre as a way of imagining the world, one that allows the novel to address both urgent contemporary concerns—climate change, genetic engineering, and immigration—along with timeless themes, such as morality, society, and human relationships. Whether its stories take place on the scale of the species or the small town, the global novel situates its characters against the widest background of the imagination. The way we live now demands nothing less than the global perspective our best novelists have to offer.

Join the for a conversation about how the way we live today demands nothing less than the global perspective our best novelists have to offer.

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Add to Calendar 4/27/2017 18:00 4/27/2017 19:30 MM/DD/YYYY America/New_York Adam Kirsch at The Corner Bookstore

What will 21st-century fiction look like? Acclaimed literary critic Adam Kirsch examines some of our most beloved writers, including Haruki Murakami, Elena Ferrante, Roberto Bolaño, and Margaret Atwood, to better understand literature in the age of globalization. The global novel, he finds, is not so much a genre as a way of imagining the world,… more

The Corner Bookstore
1313 Madison Avenue
New York, NY 10128

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